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What we earn

By Ross Elliott - posted Wednesday, 28 May 2014


Discussions about housing affordability focus almost exclusively on the price of the real estate, movements in which are monitored by multiple organisations on a seemingly daily basis. There is comparatively little discussion about people's incomes, which are equally as important as prices in determining what can and can't be reasonably afforded. The income profile of what most Australian's actually earn paints a sobering picture which could more often be taken into account in debates about housing and affordability.

It's becoming fashionable again for business lobbies to complain about Australia's high wage structure. It explains, they'll argue, why we lost Holden, Ford, Toyota, and (almost) Qantas, among other things. And yes, Australia's wages are high by competitor standards - but so are our costs. One of the most fundamental of needs, along with food and clothing, is shelter. And it's the cost of shelter relative to incomes which has been stretched to beyond reach for a large proportion of young Australians.

Reducing minimum wages or reducing wage growth further, if at the same time allowing housing costs to further escalate, will only make this situation worse. Arguably, if we could substantially reduce the cost of supplying new housing, this would relieve upward pressure on wages and work towards improving our global competitiveness – along with repairing living standards for working and middle class families, rather than eroding them.

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First, here are some of the facts on the infrequently discussed income side of the equation. (I am again indebted to the team at Urban Economics for making these available. These are top line numbers only: if you want more detailed analysis, please contact Kerrianne Bonwick).

Nearly two in three of all Australians earn less than $52,000 per annum. It doesn't much matter whether it's Brisbane, Sydney or Melbourne; the proportion is roughly the same. It's not much. Slightly more than another one in every eight earn from $52,000 to $78,000 per annum. Roughly eight in ten Australians earn less than $78,000 per annum.

Personal Incomes

 
Brisbane
Sydney
Melbourne
< $52,000
64.4%
62.8%
65.4%
$52,000-$78,000
15.0%
13.8%
14.1%
$78,000 to $104,000
7.0%
7.2%
6.4%
> $104,000
6.3%
8.2%
6.5%
Not Stated
7.2%
8.1%
7.7%

Source: Urban Economics

Problem? It is if you're trying to buy into the housing market. Take a modest house of say $400,000 (very modest depending on location). A worker on $50,000 – and these represent nearly two thirds of all workers remember – is facing a price multiple which is 8 times their gross pre-tax income. Basically, two thirds of us are stuffed in terms of affording even a modest $400,000 property if we weren't already in the market. A more reasonable price multiple of say 5 times income would require an income of $80,000 per annum or more. But there are less than 15% of Australians who fit this category.

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But wait, shouldn't we count household, as opposed to personal, incomes? A good point, particularly for younger families and young couples, where dual incomes are the norm due to necessity.

But even based on combined household incomes, a third of all households earn less than $52,000 per annum. Another 14% to 15% earn between $52,000 and $78,000 and another 11% or 12% earn between $78,000 and $104,000. A reasonably healthy 30% of all households bring in a combined $104,000 per annum or more, but seven in ten bring in less than that.

Taking our modest $400,000 home again, and roughly half of all household incomes fall short of the $80,000 mark required for a price-to-income multiple of five. For one in three of every households, their combined income means a price to income multiple of eight times. They are pretty much stuffed, still.

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This article was first published on The Pulse.



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About the Author

Ross Elliott is an industry consultant and business advisor, currently working with property economists Macroplan and engineers Calibre, among others.

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