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Politicians with trustworthy eyes

By David Leyonhjelm - posted Wednesday, 17 October 2018


In Leonard Cohen’s song Chelsea Hotel, there is a line that goes:

She told me again she preferred handsome men, but for me she would make an exception.

The song is about Janis Joplin, who had a brief encounter with Cohen in the hotel.  What the line shows is that Joplin tended to discriminate against men she didn’t consider handsome.

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Discrimination is a part of life. Indeed, I don’t believe I’ve ever met anyone who doesn’t discriminate in one way or another. When it comes to choosing a partner, whether for life or a brief encounter, discrimination is rampant.

It is also found in politics. My mother once told me she voted for a particular party because she thought the eyes of the leader of the other side were too close together. She would have agreed with Janis Joplin. 

As a senator, my concern is whether this should matter to governments. Should we be left alone to discriminate as we like, or should certain types of discrimination be prohibited? If we are to prohibit certain types of discrimination, is there a rational basis for deciding what they are, and how might we prevent such prohibition becoming an unwarranted intrusion into our lives?

There is no doubt that some forms of discrimination are abhorrent. Many years ago I spent several months living and working in South Africa. It was during the apartheid era, when blacks, whites and ‘coloureds’ were supposedly living separate parallel lives. There were separate buses and bus stops, public toilets, post office entrances and residential zones, all determined by race.

Such discrimination is now prohibited, and overt manifestations of apartheid are long gone. Nonetheless, there are still predominantly black, white and coloured residential areas in today’s South Africa; people still like to live among those with whom they feel most comfortable. In other words, they discriminate.

Apartheid was a government policy, imposed by force of law. Choosing to continue living in particular areas is not. The difference is very significant.

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In Australia it is illegal to discriminate on the basis of race, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin, age, disability, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, intersex status, transgender status, carer responsibilities, marital or relationship status, pregnancy, breastfeeding, family responsibilities, religion, political opinion, social origin, medical record, criminal record and trade union activity.

Such prohibitions apply to employment, education, access to premises, provision of goods, services or facilities, accommodation, clubs, sport and requests for information.

Depending on how she defined handsome, a woman with Joplin’s taste in men might only be unaffected if she didn’t charge for her favours.

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This article was first published in the Australian Financial Review.



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About the Author

David Leyonhjelm is the Liberal Democrat Senator for NSW.

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